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SEND

Our Special Educational Needs (SEN) Information Report outlines the support and provision for parents / carers of children who have a SEND in our schools at Bainbridge, Askrigg and West Burton.

See also our Special Educational Needs and or Disability (SEND) Policy.

The Local Authority has also published for Parents a Local Offer, which outlines what provision is available in North Yorkshire, in Education, Health and Care for young people 0 - 25 with SEND.

You can also download our overview of provision here

If any member of our school community has questions or would like further information in relation to special educational needs or disabilities please feel free to contact the school and make an appointment to see Mrs Wendy Grannan (SENCo).

Within this section of the website there is a range of information designed to help parents and carers understand the school's approach to supporting children with special educational needs and disabilities. 

 Click here to view our Single Equality Scheme

 

What does SEN(D) mean?

 

At Bainbridge, Askrigg and West Burton Primary Schools we believe that all children can make good progress when provided with high quality differentiated teaching which takes account of specific learning styles.

Children are assessed regularly to ensure that they are making the expected progress and there is a shared responsibility for progress.  Teachers meet termly with the headteacher to discuss pupil progress during which children identified as not making expected progress are discussed and interventions are planned.  For the majority of children these ongoing conversations are sufficient to secure progress.

 

For some pupils however additional SEN support is required.  A child can have SEN in one of the four areas of need (as identified in the 2014 SEN Code of Practice): 

 -      Cognition and Learning Needs

-       Emotional, Social and Mental Health Needs

-       Communication and Interaction

-       Sensory and/or Physical Needs

 

 Who do I need to know?

 

In most cases your primary contact will be your child’s class teacher; however there may be times where the education of your child leads to involvement from the SENCo, Mrs Wendy Grannan. If you have any concerns regarding your child then please raise them with the class teacher and/or the SENCo.

 

How do I know if my child has a special need?

 

Your child’s class teacher, the headteacher and Special Education Needs Coordinator (SENCo), will use their professionalism and judgement to decide where a pupil has barriers to their learning.  Where members of staff become concerned about an area of learning or development of a pupil they will first of all invite parents into school in order to share their concerns.  Once a discussion has taken place the teacher will then share their concerns with the SENCo and headteacher.

 

The SENCO will then meet with the class teacher and/or parents to establish strategies which could overcome these barriers, during which a date for a follow up conversation will be arranged.

 

Occasionally there will be instances where, as a parent, you may feel that it is in the child’s or teacher's best interests to draw attention to a matter. At such times, parents are warmly welcomed to see either the class teacher or SENCO to discuss problems. This can either be done informally through a quick chat either before or at the end of the teaching day, or formally; whereby parents are invited to arrange a mutually convenient time for discussion.  

 

For further information please see the SEND policy.  A paper copy can be provided if required, please speak to a member of staff.

 

How is Additional SEN support provided?

 

The approach to special educational needs provision at Bainbridge, Askrigg and West Burton Primary Schoiols takes account of the continuum of special educational needs and recognises that good practice can take many different forms.  This reflects current government recommendations that schools adopt a graduated response to provision of educational opportunities.  We firmly believe that these strategies need to be underpinned by the following key principles:

  • That all children can learn and make progress
  • That all teachers are teachers of SEN and there is a shared responsibility for the progress of all pupils regardless of their needs.
  • That a differentiated curriculum is not SEN provision - differentiated learning opportunities are given to all pupils.
  • That provision for a child with SEN should match the nature of their needs and must take account of their future needs and aspirations.

There should not be an assumption that all children make progress at the same rate.  A judgement has to be made in each case as to what it is reasonable to expect a particular child to achieve.  Where progress is not adequate, it will be necessary to take some additional or different action to enable the child to learn more effectively and this is referred to as additional SEN support.  Whatever the level of pupils’ difficulties, the key test of how far their learning needs are being met is whether they are making adequate progress.

 

When a class teacher or the SENCO identify the child with SEN the class teacher should provide interventions that are additional to or different from those provided as part of the school’s usual differentiated curriculum and strategies. Provision is made for children based on assessment of their identified needs rather than to reflect the existence of a particular condition or syndrome. 

The provision of additional SEN support must take account of a child making insufficient progress despite having had access to high quality differentiated teaching.    These may be learning needs or persistent emotional or behavioural difficulties which are not ameliorated by the behaviour management techniques usually employed in the school.   The Inclusion Team will instigate further assessments of the child’s particular strengths and weaknesses.

 

Additional SEN support might make use of:

  • Different learning materials or special equipment
  • Grouping strategies of different types and sizes
  • Working outside the ordinary classroom for part of the time
  • Pre-teaching a pupil about a subsequent lesson
  • Access to additional resources / adult support
  • Small group / 1:1 interventions focusing on specific areas of need
  • Means of communication other than speech, including ICT aids, signing, symbols or
  • Non-sighted methods of reading, such as Braille, or non-visual or non-aural ways of acquiring information
  • ICT aids or adapted equipment to allow access to written work and/or practical activities.

 

The content of the additional provision will be recorded by the child’s class teacher who remains responsible for working with the child on a daily basis and for planning and/or delivering an individualised programme. 

Where a child continues to make little or no progress in specific areas over a long period of time despite the provision detailed above, a request for help from external services may be made.  This is always done in consultation with parents. 

 

What is an intervention?

 

An intervention is a specific and time limited education programme which is led by a class teacher, teaching assistant or provision leader. A variety of interventions are used throughout our schools and these are detailed on the whole school provision map.  If you would like to see a copy of the whole school provision map then please see the SENCO, or the headteacher.

 If interventions are to be successful then there are a number of critical success factors:

  • Children’s abilities must be assessed pre- and post-intervention to assess the impact of the intervention. 
  • Clear, thorough, ongoing and relevant recording systems which document the interventions made by the school
  • The SENCO must regularly review interventions in order to consider the value for money.

 

We are confident in our belief that children learn best when provision is made which enables them to access the curriculum at their own level, and therefore it is only in certain circumstances that children will be withdrawn from the classroom for an intervention.

 

What happens if support provided by school does not enable my child to make progress?

 

Please note that the revised SEN code of practice is due to be effective as of September 2014 this information will be updated in order to reflect such changes.

For a very few pupils the help given by schools through additional SEN support may not be sufficient to enable a pupil to make progress.  It will then be necessary for a school, in consultation with the parents and any external agencies already involved, to consider whether to ask the Local Authority to initiate a statutory assessment. 

A statutory assessment is a detailed investigation into the educational needs of a child.  Where the school, parents and other professionals agree that statutory assessment is appropriate, the school will provide written evidence (referred to as a Request for Statutory Assessment or RSA) to the Local Authority about:

 

  • The nature of the school’s additional SEN provision
  • Details and reviews of the impact of interventions
  • Records of regular reviews and their outcomes
  • National Curriculum attainment levels in literacy and mathematics
  • Educational and other assessments, for example from an educational psychologist or an advisory specialist support teacher
  • The views of the parent and of the pupil
  • Any involvement by other professionals

 

Upon receiving the RSA, a panel of experts then consider the range of evidence and consider whether a statement of special educational needs is necessary.  This will describe:

  • what your child’s special needs are
  • the objectives, or targets to be achieved
  • how those targets are going to be met – the educational provision required
  • the monitoring arrangements
  • the school or pre-school setting your child will attend
  • any non-educational needs your child has and how those will be met

 

How will I be involved?

 

The SEN Code of Practice 2014 states that schools must provide a family centred approach and we recognise that parents know and understand their child best.

As normal school practice all parents are invited to consultation evenings during the year.  In addition to this where a child is receiving additional SEN support we hold planning and review meetings regularly to set clear goals, discuss the activities and support that will help achieve them, review progress and identify the responsibilities of the parent, the pupil and the school.

The SENCo will ensure that records of these meetings are shared by home and school, and the actions agreed will form the beginning of the next meeting.

Prior to a meeting with school it is often useful for families to have thought about and discussed the interests, aspirations and needs of the child.  A prompt is available from school which helps parents to think about the type of details which will be discussed at meetings. 

 

What arrangements will be made for statutory assessments (SATs)?

 

All pupils are assessed termly in order to provide an accurate picture of their abilities and progress at any particular time.  At the end of key stage two all schools are required to formally assess children’s learning.  This is currently done through the SATS and the vast majority of children are able to access these tests.

For some individuals additional access arrangements may be made in order to allow fair access to testing.  Access arrangements will only be made to ensure that children are able to fairly access testing.  These arrangements form part of daily classroom practice and may include:

  • Additional time
  • The use of a scribe
  • A reader or prompter
  • Adapted test materials
  • Access to alternative tests 
  •  

For the end of key stage two tests some arrangements must be applied for externally.  The SENCo works with year six staff to identify children for whom this applies.  In very rare circumstances it may be deemed inappropriate for a child to take the end of key stage tests.  In such cases teacher assessments will be used, parents will be involved in this decision. 

 

What if I disagree with decisions about my child’s education?

 

At all stages we endeavour to involve parents in the education of their child and will work together to ensure that provision is appropriate for individuals.  Despite this, there may be times when you disagree with a decision made.

In such cases we ask that you contact the head teacher in the first instance, who will be able to work with you.

 

What arrangements are made for transition?

 

We are committed to providing support which enables a successful transition to any new school to be made. The importance of early identification, assessment and provision for any child who may have special educational needs cannot be over-emphasised.  The earlier action is taken, the more responsive the child is likely to be, and the more readily intervention can be made. The SENCo, along with other members of staff, liaises closely with local schools to share information and where necessary implement additional transition arrangements.

 

 These vary with individual circumstances, but may include:

  • Additional opportunities for children to visit school.
  • Observations of the child by members of staff.
  • Meetings with parents or specialists.
  • Information sharing between schools.
  • Staff training.

 

 Where a child with SEND is transferring to another school we endeavour to share all information and prepare our pupils for the transition using the approaches detailed above as necessary.  

 

What is the Local offer?

 

Along with all schools, the Local Authority are required to provide information to parents on how to seek additional support beyond that which is ‘normally available’ for their child.

The local offer is an outline of the services available for children and young people in North Yorkshire.  The local offer details the services available to children and families from 0-25.  The main aim of the local offer is to enable families to see readily the support they can expect locally without having to struggle to find the information.

 

The North Yorkshire local offer can be accessed through the following link: North Yorkshire local offer

 

There is also a young person’s version which can be accessed by clicking on this link: Young person’s version

Who can provide support to me?

 

There are a range of services which exist to provide support to parents and many of these are detailed in North Yorkshires local offer.  In addition to this, we hope that the following information will be useful to you:

Parent Partnership Coordinators can offer impartial advice and support which could include making a home visit to listen to any concerns you may have, or attend meetings with you. They may also be able to put you in touch with other organisations or parent support groups.

A Parent Partnership Co-ordinator can be contacted through North Yorkshire on 0845 034 9469.

 

There is also great work done by the Contact a Family charity.  This charity aims to support the families of disabled children and information can be accessed by following the link: Contact a Family